What Are You Trying to Prove Through Your Writing? #AuthorToolboxBlogHop

            I have more to discuss about secondary characters, and I’ll continue on this subject in September. I’m taking the month of August off to work on writing projects. For right now, I’d like to discuss purpose in writing.  
http://victoriamarielees.blogspot.com

When authors sit down to write, they need to consider the purpose of the story or essay they wish to create. Aside from trying to entertain or offer inspiration, discovering the specific intention for a piece of writing will help the author stay focused. Having a specific purpose for your writing gives structure to your book project. You make decisions on what to say and how to say it based on this purpose.
I read an informative post by Jennie Nash about writing with intention. You can access it here. Nash believes that when writers are clear on their intention for a piece of writing, that intention will guide the writing process.
This makes sense to me. Writing with intention is knowing the purpose of your story or memoir. It’s having a point to make. The purpose of the writing project is what the writer is going to show in this story or memoir, and through that intention, the writer shows why the story or memoir is important her.
            Why am I writing about my college journey as a mother of five?  
To demonstrate that fear and doubt are a part of life. You can’t let them keep you from attempting difficult tasks.
To demonstrate that if you trust in yourself to do the hard work, you might discover that you’re smarter than the world would have you believe.
*Please feel free to offer comments or ask questions about the purpose for my memoir. This helps me to move forward in my writing.*
Authors should give fiction, memoir, and even poetry a purpose to help keep themselves focused on their intent.
So how does writing with intention give structure to a project?
It forces you to think in specific scenes. It keeps you thinking of the writing project as a whole. Because you have a firm purpose for this piece of writing, you consider scenes or experiences that prove what you want to share with the reader. You ask particular why and how questions of each character and scene. How does this scene fit into the purpose of the story? Why is this character necessary in this story?
You’re not just reaching for isolated thoughts or bits of action. You are selecting connected information, characters, scenes, or actual events. Remember to think: what are you trying to prove to the reader? In my case, I’m trying to prove that even an unprepared and insecure mother of five who struggled early in school can survive college if she studies constantly.
Thank you for visiting Adventures in Writing. Please follow my blog if you haven’t already and connect with me online. Leave your blog link in the comment so I can be sure to do the same for you. To continue hopping through more amazing blogs or to join our Author Toolbox blog hop, click here
Please note that I will not post in August of 2018. I have many writing projects I desperately need to address. Thanks for always reading my Adventures in Writing blog posts and sharing your insight. It means the world to me. Enjoy your summer!

35 thoughts on “What Are You Trying to Prove Through Your Writing? #AuthorToolboxBlogHop”

  1. Hi Victoria – you have a story to tell … for yourself, for others who know they can achieve, even with a family around them, tales to tell … and then for your children so they can remember those days. Enjoy your writing in August – cheers Hilary

    Reply
  2. It is such a pleasure to see your smiling face on Adventures in Writing, Hilary. Thank you so much for your kind words. They truly mean the world to me. And thanks for your good wishes. I need them. Enjoy the rest of your summer!

    Reply
  3. I think there's a camp of writers (and publishing professionals) who prefer work without an underlying motive, but that's not the type of work that I like to read. If there's no underlying message, moral of the story, or none of the characters learn something significant about life, give it to someone else to read. Great post!

    Reply
  4. I love how you phrase "What are you trying to prove to the reader?" It's very powerful and a great focal point as one writes. Thank you for making this question so clear. Enjoy your month of writing in August. 🙂

    Reply
  5. What an interesting point to think about 🙂 I know there's a message buried in my story, but I haven't put it into words yet and I think that might help me move forward!

    Good luck with your projects in August 🙂

    Reply
  6. Hi, Raimey! You know, I can't think how you can even create a story without an "underlying message or moral." How do you know where you are going? You'd have no direction.

    Thank you so much for sharing your insight here at Adventures in Writing. And thanks for your kind words. Enjoy the rest of your summer!

    Reply
  7. Thank you, Erika, for your kind words. I truly appreciate them. I believe that focal points actually help us move forward in our writing.

    Here's hoping that August will be productive. Thanks for your note here at Adventures in Writing. All best to you.

    Reply
  8. Hi Louise! So many people struggle with fear and doubt before starting something new, something that will take years to accomplish. To move forward in any project, we need to come to terms with whatever is keeping us from achieving our goals. All the luck with your writing project as well.

    Thanks for offering your insight and good wishes here at Adventures in Writing. Enjoy the rest of your summer!

    Reply
  9. Hi Anna! Could you offer your definition of a logline for me and the readers of Adventures in Writing? Thanks so much.

    I think all writers need some kind of reminder of why they are writing their story or memoir. Something to keep them focused; scene to scene.

    It's always a pleasure seeing you here at Adventures in Writing. And thanks for sharing your insight. Enjoy the rest of your summer!

    Reply
  10. I don't really consider the purpose of the stories I write, but there are sometimes lessons or emotions I want to convey that come from my characters' pasts or growth. I think it may be different for nonfiction or memoirs, though.

    Reply
  11. Hi Victoria! Great post on defining purpose. I used to write whatever I felt, before I realized it *felt* like the writing was going nowhere. This is a great reminder that purpose must infuse each scene, each chapter of our stories. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  12. This is definitely true of the novel I am writing right now! After my rough draft, I had to ask myself this question. Once I answered it, it was much more clear to me which areas I needed to work on and flesh out in order to give the story that feel that I was aiming for.

    Reply
  13. I knew when I started writing my series that I wanted to write the type of books I grew up loving. That was my intention. In some ways, it makes it harder as I do not allow my characters to cuss or engage in sex, (they are only 13), or become in bloody or violent adventures. Thanks for your post. It reminded me why.

    Reply
  14. I need to keep this in my head while re-working my novel. There's so much to say when talking about your character's story. My challenge is to stay focused on the plot and keep it moving, not digress into other interesting aspects that don't pull the plot forward. Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  15. It could be, Chrys, although I think your lessons may be the point of your stories.

    It's always a pleasure seeing you here at Adventures in Writing. And thanks for sharing your insight. Enjoy the rest of your summer!

    Reply
  16. Hello and welcome to Adventures in Writing, Elle! Thanks for your kind words. I think writing with purpose does infuse our scenes and therefore our stories.

    Thanks for your note. Please visit Adventures in Writing again. All best to you.

    Reply
  17. Hello and welcome to Adventures in Writing, Christy! Writing is all about asking the right questions to give meaning to our stories or essays. I'm glad my post was helpful to you.

    Thanks for your note. Please visit Adventures in Writing again. All best to you.

    Reply
  18. Hello and welcome to Adventures in Writing, Elizabeth! I am with you. I can do without the cussing and sex and violence in the adult books as well. Writing is about committing to your own morals as well as your characters.

    Thanks for your note. Please visit Adventures in Writing again. All best to you.

    Reply
  19. Absolutely right, Dawn. Focus only on what is happening in the present story, using backstory only when the character needs to think back to a prior experience to make sense of what's happening in the present. Writing is so difficult.

    All the best with your WIP, Dawn. It's always a pleasure seeing you here at Adventures in Writing. Enjoy your weekend.

    Reply
  20. I love to write with purpose and like Raimey said in her comment with underlying motive. That's what makes it interesting for me – and I hope my readers, too. I'm looking forward to your next post on this topic.

    Reply
  21. Sometimes I think writers may not recognize that they are, in fact, doing this in their story or memoir. Story needs to say something about life, and it does that by character growth.

    It's always a pleasure seeing you here at Adventures in Writing. And thanks for sharing your insight. Enjoy the rest of your summer, Kristina!

    Reply
  22. I guess finding a purpose in your writing is comparable to coming up with the right theme(s) for your book. Both help to answer the questions "How does this scene fit into the purpose of the story?" and "Why is this character necessary in this story?" as you point out in this blog. Very informative.

    Have a productive writing month and blogging break in August, Victoria. I'll take a blogging break then as well, but to NOT write and escape the busyness of life in general. 🙂

    Reply
  23. Lucky you, Liesbet. I'd so love to do that!

    Anyway, you are correct to find the purpose in your writing with themes for your book. Each character needs to be necessary for the story you are telling–complete with its themes. And each scene needs to not only fit into the purpose of the story, but also build the story logic.

    It's always a pleasure seeing you here at Adventures in Writing. And thanks for sharing your insight. Enjoy the rest of your summer, Liesbet!

    Reply
  24. I came looking for your August IWSG post, but found this one quite interesting. I agree, having a purpose when writing fiction gives a much-needed focus. Happy writing in August!

    Reply
  25. Hello and welcome to Adventures in Writing, Rhonda! Thanks so much for your note. Having a purpose with all writing is essential to focusing the manuscript or essay. Please stop by Adventures in Writing again. All best to you!

    Reply
  26. My first visit to your blog. At first, I was struck by your 'journey' as a writer who's pursuing a degree while balancing 'real life' with family, work, etc. It took me 14 years to gain that degree, but persevere, for having the credential opened doors I long dreamed of. That next idea, writing with intention, intrigues me as well, for my stories generally involve characters struggling to survive. But my latest project is about art crime. Thank you. You've given me something to think about. May your own writing/work go well.

    Reply
  27. Hello and welcome to Adventures in Writing, Beth! Thanks so much for your comment. Good for you as well for persevering to gain your college degree. It took me ten years to finish attending college part time, what with raising the family and all.

    Yes, writing with intention helps to focus a writer and thereby her manuscripts. Thanks for your note. Please visit Adventures in Writing again. All best to you.

    Reply
  28. Although I've had a purpose for my writing, I've lost it! Thanks for unknowingly calling me out on it 😉

    Also, I recently read Andrew Carnegie's autobiography and he does a phenomenal job at keeping intent in his work. Just as a source of inspiration!

    Reply
  29. Hello and welcome to Adventures in Writing! I know what you mean. It is so hard [for me] to find the purpose of my writing sometimes. And thanks for recommending Andrew Carnegie's autobiography. I'll have to check it out.

    Thanks so much for your comment. Please stop by Adventures in Writing again. All best to you!

    Reply
  30. Very interesting article. I wrote my first novel after I read a book that kept me reading late into the night when I should have been sleeping. I wanted to give someone else that feeling. I don't think I had a message or meaning. Just entertainment.

    Reply
  31. I love when I can't put a book down, Kristina. And yes, I too lose sleep for reading a good book. I think every writer wants to be able to offer an un-put-downable book to their readers. However, I feel even those types of books offer a subtle message through the decisions or actions a character makes.

    You are an amazing writer, Kristina. Thanks so much for stopping by Adventures in Writing. All best to you!

    Reply

Leave a Comment